Tangled Up In Lace

Showing posts tagged identity politics
glitterpolitic:

I think the remake of this poster is incredibly interesting, as is the intense response to it.  Majestic had this poster on their door the whole time we lived together and it always gave me chills.  It made me feel powerful and vindicated and righteous.  I really like the original poster.  I think it articulates very clearly the radical nature of queerness that the hetero world doesn’t really see.  I never saw it as being a response to gay people who don’t identify as queer, and I find it really interesting that it has been utilized to make an entirely different point in its re-imagination.
On Tumblr and in queer communities I’ve been part of outside of the internet, there certainly is a trend of rejection of lesbian identity. In my experience, lesbians are often categorized as: “homonormative”, non-radical, apolitical, second-wave, oppressive, boring, and “vanilla.”  In self-identified radical queer spaces, there is often a large-scale erasure of the extremely radical lesbian feminist history that allows us to have the language to critique anything in the first place, as well as a silencing of radical, living, breathing lesbian culture.
This is nothing other than misogyny.  We are doused in a culture that thrives on the hatred of women.  “Radical Queerness” isn’t immune from that, and in fact these communities are often responsible for perpetuating misogyny in many different ways.  One of these ways is actually by discursively defining lesbianism as archaic, backwards, and inherently apolitical.  I like using the word lesbian to describe myself.  It’s not the only word I use, and often it is not all encompassing of my desires.  But there are some spaces and some moments I experience with myself where queer just doesn’t cut it.  When I claim the word, “Lesbian” to talk of my sexuality and my politics, I invoke a rich history of brave women who taught me everything I know about survival, and fuck, is that powerful.
I don’t believe this poster to be “queer-hating”, nor do I think it is setting up a dichotomous relationship between queers and lesbians.  I think it is asking us to question a culture of radical queerness that elevates certain identities over others (ie: if you are queer, you are inherently more radical than if you are lesbian.) It is asking us to think hard about this tendency to silence and erase radical lesbian history and it is a reclamation of a perfectly valid and resistant sexual politic.
-Ashley

pretty cool that Ashley Aron’s super smart, devastatingly beautiful and someone I get to know in real life

glitterpolitic:

I think the remake of this poster is incredibly interesting, as is the intense response to it. Majestic had this poster on their door the whole time we lived together and it always gave me chills. It made me feel powerful and vindicated and righteous. I really like the original poster. I think it articulates very clearly the radical nature of queerness that the hetero world doesn’t really see. I never saw it as being a response to gay people who don’t identify as queer, and I find it really interesting that it has been utilized to make an entirely different point in its re-imagination.

On Tumblr and in queer communities I’ve been part of outside of the internet, there certainly is a trend of rejection of lesbian identity. In my experience, lesbians are often categorized as: “homonormative”, non-radical, apolitical, second-wave, oppressive, boring, and “vanilla.” In self-identified radical queer spaces, there is often a large-scale erasure of the extremely radical lesbian feminist history that allows us to have the language to critique anything in the first place, as well as a silencing of radical, living, breathing lesbian culture.

This is nothing other than misogyny. We are doused in a culture that thrives on the hatred of women. “Radical Queerness” isn’t immune from that, and in fact these communities are often responsible for perpetuating misogyny in many different ways. One of these ways is actually by discursively defining lesbianism as archaic, backwards, and inherently apolitical. I like using the word lesbian to describe myself. It’s not the only word I use, and often it is not all encompassing of my desires. But there are some spaces and some moments I experience with myself where queer just doesn’t cut it. When I claim the word, “Lesbian” to talk of my sexuality and my politics, I invoke a rich history of brave women who taught me everything I know about survival, and fuck, is that powerful.

I don’t believe this poster to be “queer-hating”, nor do I think it is setting up a dichotomous relationship between queers and lesbians. I think it is asking us to question a culture of radical queerness that elevates certain identities over others (ie: if you are queer, you are inherently more radical than if you are lesbian.) It is asking us to think hard about this tendency to silence and erase radical lesbian history and it is a reclamation of a perfectly valid and resistant sexual politic.

-Ashley

pretty cool that Ashley Aron’s super smart, devastatingly beautiful and someone I get to know in real life

(Source: not-queer-as-in)

(Photo reblogged from glitterpolitic)

It is the kneejerk reaction of loving a person who immerses themselves in Queer Theory to hear the phrase ‘identity politics’ and shudder.

(Link reblogged from moxxxieheart-deactivated2012040)

RE-THINK EVERYTHING, INTERROGATE YOURSELF, KNOW YOUR ENEMY: Pt 1

glitterpolitic:

I want to create political movements where we can be gentle with one another so that we can learn, grow and move together in new ways. Most of the time, we cling really hard to our identities, our politics, and our ways of understanding the world which prevents new connections from happening. On tumblr our defenses are high and when someone speaks out about our identities, behavior, politics, or the problems that they create, we immediately stage a search and destroy mission aimed to take them down and make ourselves seem cool and smart. This usually consists of a group of people getting angry and saying hurtful things about a certain person or issue leaving no room for growth or understanding, only divisiveness and alienation. We need to stop taking each other out and look at the bigger picture.

To me, there is a difference between anger and rage. Rage can be productive, it can fuel us to destroy and rethink our ways of understanding ourselves and the world. It can mobilize us to connect in new ways and look at how we are hurting others and ourselves. Anger strikes me as something very different than rage. Anger often emerges from a place of fear and can be used as a way to exercise power over other bodies and people. Generally the way we talk to each other about our differences on tumblr comes from a place of anger. I don’t think that anger isn’t valid or necessary sometimes, it is. More often than not though, people use angry or aggressive words as a way to prop themselves up as unimpeachable beacons of knowledge, or authority figures and are actually just perpetuating the same counter-norms and exercising power in the same ways as the systems we all claim we want to destroy.

We need to start thinking of power, and oppression in new ways. Probably one of the most important things anyone ever taught me, was that dominance functions by remaining invisible. I think that is really accurate and accessible way to get people thinking about how power functions in the world in more complicated ways. It’s not just about certain people having power over others, or government having power over the people - power is everywhere. Power is all around us and constantly multiplying all of the time. If we aren’t cultivating an awareness of the ways in which we are personally reproducing and perpetuating power in our interactions with others we are just going to continue to recreate the same fucked up dynamics over and over in our social movements.

Our political identities: fat, woman, queer etc. have been created for us by the systems of power that are fucking us over (and denying us rights) in the first place. Our identities are important in many ways but we need to realize they are seriously limiting and getting caught up in the intricacies of them may only serve to dig us in deeper.  Until we find new ways that we can start to connect, I think the most important thing we can do is take care of each other so we can be dangerous together. Instead of coming at each other from a place of anger and fear, or an unexamined desire for power — perhaps we can come to one another from a place of love, gentleness, maybe even compassion? This will manifest differently for all of us, but lets take this into consideration and start talking about what this looks like.

RE-THINK EVERYTHING, INTERROGATE YOURSELF, KNOW YOUR ENEMY

- Erin Majestic Legay

Click on the bolded link for a video that takes a critical look at identity politics (subtitles available).

(Post reblogged from heavymuffintop)

Friends and family (same thing) for the sake of transparency I want you all to know I now ID as a “really romantic slut” and high priestess femme. If anyone wants to talk to me about this and start a dialogue, I’m comfortable with that. Thank you for respecting my identity

garconniere:

femmeproblems:

Femme Problems

this one just makes me sad because i’ve experienced it so much.
:(

fer real, story of my queer little life

garconniere:

femmeproblems:

Femme Problems

this one just makes me sad because i’ve experienced it so much.

:(

fer real, story of my queer little life

(Photo reblogged from garconniere)

classicnotcliche asked: you may have answered this before, but in your opinion does a femme have to self identify as lgbtq? i've asked aroundand i always get different answers

NOPE!!

You will definitely get a lot of different answers as femme means a lot of things to a lot of people but the general idea is that femmes challenge what we’ve been told about femininity and I think its using one’s idea of femininity, sexuality, and sensuality as it pertains to one’s self, unapologetic and non-patriachally based or constructed.

I think its a pretty queer way of thinking but one doesn’t have to be queer to think like one ;)

Telling femmes of the heteronormative variety that they can’t identify as femme is counterproductive and certainly not in the spirit of breaking down patriarchy.

If you feel you’re femme, you’re femme! Its really up to you to define that for yourself I think :) 

xoxo

glitterpolitic:

IDENTITY POLITICS, POLICING & FENCES

SUBTITLED VERSION HERE

This video contains some whiskey ramblings on the ways in which identity politics can sometimes mirror the discourses of dominant culture that tell us that we have to police and defend our identities like they are our property. We tried to be articulate, but it is hard to talk about such big things in such a short period of time.

Our identities are produced for us by systems of power that control how we understand and make sense of our world. Unfortunately, it is pretty much impossible to ‘disidentify’ in our mainstream north american culture. We must step into identities - or we are pushed, jammed or shoved into them. We also need identities for lots of really important reasons. Queer seems radical because there seems to be more room for flux and fluidity in it, but it is in fact, produced by the same systems of power that produce other ‘normative’ identities.

Often, queer identity is taken up in as radical in a no-questions-asked sort of way. The problem is that we cannot be radical if we aren’t asking big fucking questions, if we aren’t willing to change, grow, and make mistakes. We need to consciously be engaged in how the multiple, interlocking aspects of our identities (queer, white, working class etc.) affect the ways that we understand the world. The way we take up, and discuss identity can be damaging, hurtful, or and totally erase the experiences of other individuals. We need to be really critical of the ways that we use our identities to position ourselves, as better, smarter, more queer or more radical than “others”. We need to be critical of how we create monsters out of others when we define ourselves by what we are not.

We also need to be critical of the ways that we create and employ counter-norms within our political communities. Often we police the boundaries of these counter norms (e.g. who is/isn’t queer or ‘radical enough’) with as much violence as the state. This prevents us from connecting, communicating, and creating change -  which is exactly what this neoliberal atmosphere of divisiveness we are living our lives in wants from us.

Queers (us included) are definitely guilty of all of these things, and none of us get to exist outside of this. Though radical resistance and subversion is definitely possible, it is not radical or subversive to police other people like a mini-states.

One of the most simple and helpful things anyone has ever said to me was that ‘dominance functions by remaining invisible’. When we fight with each other, we lose. We lose because we fail to see the systems of power that win when we do this. This is not about individuals -  we are calling out systems of power that continue to divide us and prevent us from making meaningful connection. Sometimes making these things visible means that we need to really look at ourselves in ways that are hard and scary. We ask that you watch this video with a vulnerable heart, in the name of transformational social change.

in love and courage,

Ashley & Majestic

*We hope you take the time to read/watch, even though it’s long!

**We can’t ever get the subtitled version to embed. Sorry! Click the link at the top of the post for the subtitles.

*** Fisting shout out to AfroTitty in the last minute of the vid.

what I love about Big Fancy is that I can’t ever decide if I love basking in that overwhelming beauty more or appreciating that outstanding brain. I mean, I’m just so lucky I don’t have to choose

(Video reblogged from heavymuffintop)